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Post-16 education starts to flip the classroom

The adoption of flipped learning in post-16 education appears to be increasing rapidly according to new BESA research

Posted by Rebecca Paddick | May 05, 2015 | Technology

Flipped learning, a term used to describe blended learning in which students learn at home, and then carry out their homework in class, is regularly used in 19% (400) of post-16 establishments.

A further 40% of the 2,138 post-16 schools and colleges also stated that they are looking to introduce the pedagogy in the near future.

Of the 208 sixth-form leaders who responded to BESA’s survey, 171 were from schools (academy and maintained) while 37 were from sixth form colleges. 

When looking at the findings in more detail there appears to be a distinct divide between the adoption of flipped learning in sixth form colleges and schools (both academy and authority controlled). While 28% of academy and authority controlled schools stated that they are already using flipped learning, it is not being practiced in any sixth form colleges.

Whilst technology is increasingly helping lecturers adopt flipped learning practices existing classroom aids, such as textbooks, remain popular with 96% of students still using textbooks on a daily basis. By comparison 34% of students stated they had little or no use of eBooks and 47% said the same about apps.

Looking ahead two years, there is a slight shift in the forecast use of eBooks and apps but not significant. Textbooks will still be used by 91% of respondents, 84% stated they will use eBooks and 73% said they’d use apps to a certain extent.

Caroline Wright, director of the British Educational Suppliers Association (BESA) said: “This is the first time we have seen such a significant increase in the recognition, and planned use of flipped learning.

“Despite today’s evidence that the world of post-16 learning appears to be changing, we can expect to see the range of resources used broadening rather than narrowing as it is clear that text books still play a leading role in students’ studies.”

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